Irwin's of Co Tyrone, Ireland and thence Australia, Canada & New Zealand

Surname Index Page Irwin Index Page My Irwin's of Ballygawley, Co Tyrone My Irwin's of New Zealand My Irwin's of Canada My Irwin's of AustraliaUnrelated Irwin FamiliesSources

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From Cavey to New Zealand

In the mid 1860s three Irwin cousins from Cavey, Ballygawley, Co Tyrone, Ireland, emigrated to New Zealand, Robert & William (brothers) and Mary, a 1st cousin and sister of Robert's wife, Elizabeth. All three settled at Timaru, in the South Island of New Zealand and shortly after her arrival Mary married William Rooney, who was a near neighbour of the Irwins back in Co TyroneTyrone and also an immigrant to Timaru. Mary & William & their descendants are charted in the "Irwins of Ballygawley & Beyond" chart.



1.1.5.1. Robert Irwin (s/o Archibald, s/o Thomas), born 2/5/1841,[9,38,51,56,113] Cavey Townland, Ballygawley, County Tyrone, Ireland.[11,113] Died 26/8/1913 (72yo),[51,114] No.59 Craigie Avenue, Timaru,[113] and buried 28/8/1913 (73yo), Block D, Plot 32, General Section, Timaru Cemetery, Domaine Ave, Timaru, New Zealand.[51] {The family bible,[63] gives a DOD of 25/8/1913, as does [113]} "In Loving Memory of Elizabeth, Beloved Wife of Robert Irwin, Died 8th October 1911, Aged 70 years. Also Robert Irwin, Died August 26th 1913, Aged 72 years. At Rest. Also their daughters Catherine, who passed away on August 9th 1925, And Elizabeth, on July 2nd 1937".[51] Cause of death was pneumonia of 7 days duration & possible heart failure.[113] Robert's obituary, published in the Timaru Herald read: "The death is recorded this morning of Mr Robert Irwin of Craigie Avenue. The deceased was a very early and respected resident of Timaru, where he and his wife who predeceased him brought up a numerous family, now grown up and filling useful positions in various parts of the country near or distant. Mr Irwin was the first janitor of the Timaru High School and held that position for many years and he has been a member of the South School Committee since its first election. He had a severe illness a year or so ago, but recovered from that fairly well. last week he caught a chill which brought on his fatal illness."[113] Robert's will was probated 8/9/1913.[58] On 19/7/1865 Robert (as Robert Irwin Jr) was a co-signatory of a letter published in the Timaru Herald requesting that John
Robert Irwin
Robert Irwin
Image
- Robert Irwin IV
Hayhurst, Esq., of Timuka {sic, actually 'Temuka"}, allow himself to be nominated as Representative in the forthcoming session of the Provincial Council of Canterbury, with undertaking by the signatories to support him with their votes and interest.[131] Like many of the Ballygawley descended Irwins, Robert was an 'Orangeman' - on the 19/12/1890 'Brother Robert Irwin' was elected District Master of the Loyal Orange Lodge, District No. 1, Timaru at a meeting at the Oddfellows Hall, Timaru.[129] "The annual meeting of the Loyal Orange Lodge, District No. 1, Timaru, was held in the Oddfellows Hall, Timaru, on Friday, all the officers being present. The lodge was opened in due form by the W.M., the Chaplain reading a portion of the Scripture. There was a good attendance of members. The general business being got through, the election of officers was then proceeded with, and the following was the result:- District Master, Bro Robert Irwin (selected) 5 Deputy Master, Bro James Campbell, of No. 49 (reelected), Secretary, Bro Archibald Mahon, of No. 35 (re-elected), Treasurer, Bro E. Davidson, of No, 40; Chaplain, Bro W. Marshall, of No. 43 ; First Committee man, Bro Thomas Jones, of No. 19, This being all the business the lodge was then closed. In the evening the members were invited to a supper by the Timaru brethren, when about 30 sat down to a very excellent spread and spent a very enjoyable evening, which was brought to a close by all the members singing the National Anthem."[129] On 12/10/1876, Robert Irwin of Timaru was "was charged with driving his horse on October the 12th at such a pace within the borough as to endanger the lives of foot passengers. He admitted the charge, and was fined 10s", as published in the Timaru Herald's Resident Magistrate's Court roundup.[132] {It is impossible to tell whether this was Robert from Ballygawley or the other Robert Irwin of Timaru, originally from Co Leitrim, Ireland (charted elsewhere)}
Elizabeth Irwin Sr
Elizabeth Irwin Sr
Image - Robert Irwin IV
Possibly the Robert Irwin who listed in 1894 as a lay member of the Presbytery of Timaru.[130] {Which Robert Irwin is unknown} Farmer, 4/1862 (at Cavey).[145] Farm labourer, 12/1862 (at Timaru).[55,56] Employed as a station hand & ferryman at a station {ie: ranch} near Lake Tekapo in the Mackenzie Country (near Timaru), 1862-1866.[113] Gardener, 1881,1893,1913.[51,57] Between 1867-1913 his occupation was variously described as farmer & gardener.[113] Janitor, 1880-1902.[113,126] In 1879 Robert applied for the position of janitor at Timaru High School, his application was successful and he was employed there from 1880[126] until 1902.[113] {[113] states employed as janitor for 22 years & [126] indicates he began his employment in 1880} Robert's appointment to the position was published in the Timaru Herald, 3/12/1879: "Thirty-six applications were received for the post of Janitor to the School. The Chairman explained that the Janitor would have to devote his whole time to the care of the building and grounds, generally taking his directions from the Rector. The salary offered was £100 a year. After some discussion of the merits of various applicants, it was resolved to offer the post to Mr Robert Irwin, to enter on his duties on the completion of the building."[126] From 9/7/1873 to 29/8/1873, Robert Irwin was mentioned in the following advertisement in the Timaru Herald: "See Potatoes. F. W. Stubbs and Co. Have a large quantity of Early Shaws and Flounders Grown by Mr Robert Irwin, of Timaru, and can be guaranteed to be true to name. F. W. Stubbs & Co., Timaru."[125] From 17/5/1888 to 27/6/1888, Robert Irwin ran the following advertisement daily in the Timaru Herald: "Fruit trees. The Undersigned desires to notify that he is now prepared to execute orders Wholesale and Retail, for Four-year old fruit trees, most of which are on the blight proof stock. The list includes some of the choicest sorts in cultivation, and are all guaranteed true to name. My 14 year personal experience in the business enables me to supply the Public with a really genuine article. Inspection Invited. Robert Irwin, West Belt. Timaru."[123] On 13/3/1889, Robert Irwin advertised in the Timaru Herald: "Wanted to buy a cow in full profit. Apply to Robert Irwin, West Town Belt."[127] On 6/3/1885, the Timaru Herald noted in its roundup of the Resident Magistrate's Court that Robert Irwin was fined 5s & costs of 7s for "allowing a cow to wander at large".[128] On 17/8/1894 & 18/8/1897, Robert Irwin had the following advertisement in the Timaru Herald: "Messers Glasson & Co. will offer for Sale on Saturday, 17th, On account of Mr Robert Irwin - 100 First Class Apple Trees, 50 Splendid Plum Trees All the above are 4 years old, the Apples being all on the blight proof stock and guaranteed true to name. The list includes the best kinds in cultivation."[124] {It is impossible to tell which of the two Robert Irwins living on West Belt, Timaru, placed these adverts, both were gardeners & orchardistsMarried Elizabeth Irwin,[9,11,21,38,58] 22/4/1862,[38,63,145,146] Ballygawley Presbyterian Church,[145] Parish of Errigal Keerogue, County Tyrone, Ireland.[38,145] By licence, Rev. James Phillips.[145] Both were single, of Cavey, Co Tyrone and their ages given as 21yo {usually means they claimed they were of age, that is, 21yo or older, and actually proves little}.[145] Robert, a farmer, s/o Archibald Irwin, a farmer, & Elizabeth, no occupation listed, d/o James Irwin, farmer.[145] Witnesses were Archibald Turner & Robert Givens {last surname is illegible}.[145,146] Elizabeth was born 1840-1843, [38,51,56,63,145] died 8/10/1911,[51,63,114] No.59 Craigie Avenue, Timaru,[113] and buried 10/10/1911 (70yo), Timaru Cemetery, Timaru, New Zealand, with her husband.[51] Elizabeth's obituary, published in the Timaru Herald read: "A very old resident of Timaru, Mrs Irwin, wife of Mr R. Irwin, 59 Craigie Avenue, died yesterday morning from sudden heart failure, aged 70, after an illness of only a few hours. She had been about on Saturday and visited a daughter on Saturday evening. Mr & Mrs Irwin landed at Timaru in the Echunga, one of the earliest direct ships, on Anniversary Day 1862. For a while they lived on one of the Mackenzie Country stations, and then settled in Timaru, where they have resided ever since. Mr Irwin was the first janitor of the Timaru High School and held the post for 22 years. Mrs Irwin was a very quiet, unassuming woman, the beloved mother of five daughters and five sons."[113] Elizabeth was the daughter of James Irwin and Elizabeth Moore,[6,11,21,28,38,50] and was Robert's first cousin.[11,21] According to a descendent of Robert and Elizabeth, the two fled to New Zealand to escape the scandal.[11] Robert & Elizabeth emigrated to New Zealand, arriving at Timaru 16/12/1862 on the "Echunga".[28,55,56] The Echunga departed London 10/9/1862 with a total of 332 immigrants bound for Timaru and Lyttleton.[55,56] Robert & Elizabeth arrived as government assisted immigrants; they were listed as being married and with no children.[55] Upon arrival in NZ they settled in the Timaru district,[28] where they remained the rest of their lives.[51,113] Resided 1862-1866 on a station in the Mackenzie Country (near Timaru), New Zealand.[113] {Unfortunately I have been unable to find any information on which station Robert was at. There is uncertainty whether Robert moved to Timaru before or after the birth of his 3rd child in mid 1867} Resided 1865, Timaru, New Zealand (as "Robert Irwin Jr" - "Robert Sr" was not a relative but resided next door to Robert Jr in Craigie Avenue).[120,122] Resided c.1867, 1881, 1893, 1913, Town Belt (now No.59 Craigie Avenue), Timaru, New Zealand.[51,57,113]

Children of Robert Irwin & Elizabeth Irwin:
i.
 
Elizabeth 'Lizzie' Irwin, born 11/2/1863,[63,113] Timaru, New Zealand.[64,113] {Birth not listed in online NZ BMD Index.[114]} Whilst her birth was registered at Timaru, at the time of her birth, Elizabeth's parents were living on a station in the Mackenzie Country (near Timaru) and it was there that Elizabeth was born.[113] Died 2/7/1937 (73yo),[51,113,114] and buried 3/7/1937 (65yo), Block F, Plot 110, General Section, Timaru Cemetery, Domaine Ave, Timaru, New Zealand.[51,64] Elizabeth was a dressmaker,[64] employed by McGiver Davies.[113] Did not marry.[113,115] According to family tradition "Lizzie had an unfortunate love affair. The wedding was arranged but her finance failed to turn up at the church. Lizzie never looked at another man for the rest of her life."[113] Resided & spent her later years at No.4 College Road, Timaru, New Zealand (around the corner from her parent's home).[113] No issue.[113,115]
ii.

Catherine 'Kitty' Irwin, born 29/6/1865 (Irvine),[63,113,114] Timaru, New Zealand.[64,113] Whilst her birth was registered at Timaru, at the time of her birth, Catherine's parents were living on a station in the Mackenzie Country (near Timaru) and it was there that she was born.[113] Died 9/8/1925 (60yo),[50,64,113,114] and buried 11/8/1925 (54yo), Block F, Plot 110, General Section, Timaru Cemetery Cemetery, Domaine Ave, Timaru, New Zealand.[51] 'Kitty' remained at home with her parents & had no occupation other than 'home duties'.[64] Did not marry.[113,115] No issue.[113,115]
iii.

William George 'George' Irwin, born 7/6/1867,[60,62,63,113,114] Timaru, New Zealand.[62,64,113] Died 4/4/1917 (49yo),[63,64,113,114] and buried 4/4/1917 (49yo), Block G, Plot 381, General Section, Timaru Cemetery, Domaine Ave, Timaru, New Zealand.[60,113] {Went by the name George, presumably to distinguish himself from William George Irwin of Timaru, s/o the other Robert (married to Margaret), who was the senior by several years to Robert of Cavey, married to Elizabeth} George was postmaster at Otaio, New Zealand, 1894-1903 (and possibly after that date),[62,64] and prior to that a blacksmith, also at Otaio.[64] 'George' does not have a gravestone (destroyed or never existed?), but there is a marker in the plot "In Loving Memory of Sarah Jane Elliott and Mary Isabella Irwin".[60] Married Mary Isabella Elliott,[60,66,113] 4/4/1890, Timaru, New Zealand.[61,64,113,114] Marriage was performed by the Rev. Wm. Gillies at the residence of the bride, Edward Street, Timaru.[61] "On April 4th, at the residence of the bride, Edward Street, Timaru, by the Rev. Wm. Gillies, William George, eldest son of Robert Irwin, Timaru, to Mary Isabella, youngest daughter of the late Wm. Elliot, Esq., County Donegal, Ireland."[61] Mary was born 1863,[60,63] Ireland,[64] died 7/11/1946 (83yo),[63,64,114] at home, 18 Craigie Ave, Timaru,[64] and was buried with her husband, 9/11/1946 (87yo), Timaru Cemetery, Domaine Ave, Timaru, New Zealand.[60] Buried with George and Mary is Mary's mother, Sarah Jane Elliott.[60] After George's death Mary returned to Timaru & operated a boarding house from her home, Craigie Avenue, Timaru, New Zealand.[113] No issue.[114]
iv.

Archibald Irwin, born 13/7/1869,[57,63,113,114] Timaru, New Zealand.[113] Died 29/3/1937 (67yo),[52,64,113,114] Napier, New Zealand,[64,113] and was buried 4/4/1937, Block G, Plot 550, General Section, Timaru Cemetery, Domaine Ave, Timaru, New Zealand (70yo).[52] "In Loving Memory of Archibald, beloved husband of Edith Jane Irwin. Died 29th March 1937. At Rest. Edith Jane, Beloved Wife of Archibald Irwin. Died 12th May 1938. Sadly missed".[52] In 12/1878, then in 7th class, was awarded first prize for good conduct, Timaru Public School.[136] Archibald was a printer,[64] joining the staff of the Timaru Herald at the age of 14, loading the printing presses.[113] He was promoted to Head machinist at the Herald, a position he held for 30 years.[113] He then moved to Greymouth where he was in charge of the printing presses of the "Grey River Argus".[113] Not enjoying the climate he then moved to Napier where he ran the presses for the "Hawkes Bay Herald" at Napier until the printery was destroyed by an earthquake, 3/2/1931.[113] With his health declining, Archie then retired, spending his remaining years at home.[113] Married Edith Jane[52,64] 'Ada' Adams, 24/10/1893, New Zealand.[66,113,114] Edith born 6/4/1869,[52,64] died 12/5/1938 (63yo),[52,114] and buried with her husband, 14/5/1938 (68yo), Timaru Cemetery, Domaine Ave, Timaru, New Zealand.[52] No issue.[114]
* v.

Robert Irwin, born 13/11/1871, Timaru, NZ.[9,11,54,57,63,64,113] {1.1.5.1.1}
vi.
James Irwin, born 3/12/1873,[51,63,64,113,114] Timaru, New Zealand.[113] Died 9/3/1875 (15mo), Timaru,[51,53,63,64,113,114] and buried 11/3/1875, Block D, Plot 32, Timaru Cemetery, Domaine Ave, Timaru, New Zealand (15mo).[51] Buried with his parents.[51]
vii.
Thomas Irwin (Irvine),[11] born 5/4/1876,[57,63,64,113,114] Timaru, New Zealand.[57,64,113]  Died 9/8/1957 (81yo),[59,64,113,114] Ashburton, New Zealand.[64,113] Enrolled at Timaru South School, 7/2/1881, transferred to Timaru Main School, 1884.[113] Completed his schooling & entered the workforce, 27/6/1890 (14yo).[113] Employed by the NZ Railways for 35 years, by 1908 he was the foreman of the Timaru Goods Shed.[113] He retired during the Great Depression & joined with T. H. Dunn, forming the Supreme Ice Cream Company, retiring from active involvement in the 1940s due to ill health, retiring to Christchurch and thence to Ashburton, New Zealand, where he died.[113] Married Sarah Ann Moore,[59,64] 5/8/1908,[66,113,114] 'Ambyrm' (home of Sarah's parents), Balcairn, New Zealand.[113] Marriage was performed by Rev. J. McKenzie.[113] Sarah born 16/4/1876, Styx, Christchurch, New Zealand,[113] died 7/8/1956, Ashburton, New Zealand.[113,122]
Children: (a)
 
Edith Margaret Irwin,[64] born 5/12/1910, Timaru, New Zealand.[113] Died 28/8/1986, Hoon Hay, Canterbury, New Zealand.[113,122] Married David Cody Rex Shaw,[64,113] 6/1/1940, Trinity Presbyterian Church, Timaru, New Zealand.[113] David, a farmer, born 5/8/1907.[113] Resided after their marriage at No.36 Jackson Street, Timaru, New Zealand.[113] Relocated to Chalmers Avenue, Chertsey, near Ashburton, New Zealand.[113] Had issue.[113]
(b)
Arthur Thomas Irwin,[64] born 22/6/1912, Timaru, New Zealand.[113] Died 5/6/1999, Hamilton, New Zealand.[113] Office worker, Timaru Freezing Company, 1929-1931.[113] Station hand & farmer, D'Urville Island, New Zealand 1931-1935.[113] Stockman & musterer, Highfield Station, Mackenzie Country, New Zealand, 1935.[113] Stockman & cook, Marlborough, Forsyth Island, New Zealand, 1936.[113] Head shepherd, Titirangi Station, Cook Strait, New Zealand, 1937-1938.[113] Stockman, various locations in northern NSW & southern Queensland, Australia, 1938-1939.[113] Enlisted in the NZ army, 1940, & assigned to the 23rd Battalion and saw action in Greece, Crete, Egypt, Lybia, El Alamein, Tobruk, eventually returning to New Zealand in 1944 (arriving at Nelson 2 weeks before his marriage).[113] Was a farmer until he retired in 1974.[113] Married Eva Constance Webber, 26/2/1944, Nelson Cathedral, Nelson, New Zealand.[113] Resided 1944-1947, Webber Farm, French Pass, New Zealand.[113] Resided 1947-1951, family farm, Waotira, Northland, New Zealand.[113,122] Resided 1951-1974, family farm, Pukeatua, New Zealand.[113] Resided 1974-1990, No.3 Bankart Street, Raglan, New Zealand.[113] Resided 1990-1999, No3 Tidd Drive, Raglan, New Zealand.[113] Had issue.[113]
(c)Marjorie Eleanor Irwin,[64] born 14/8/1914, Timaru, New Zealand.[113] Died 16/8/1985, Christchurch, New Zealand.[113] Did not marry.[113] No issue.[122]

viii.
Sarah Jane 'Cissie' Irwin, born 1/5/1878,[57,63,64,113,114] West Belt (now Craigie Ave), Timaru, New Zealand.[57,64,113] {'Cissie' is usually a pet-name for Frances, however there is no record that Sarah was ever anything other than 'Cissie'.[122]}Died 27/7/1942, Timaru, New Zealand (64yo),[64,113,114] & buried 28/7/1942, Block H, Plot 264, General Section, Timaru Cemetery, Timaru, New Zealand (64yo).[113,115] "In Fond And Loving Memory of Alexander, Dearly Loved Husband of Cissie Fraser. Died Aug 23rd 1928, Aged 53 years. Also his dearly beloved Wife Cissie. Died July 27th 1942, aged 64 years. He lives with us in memory still, and will for evermore. And their son John Douglas, husband of Trixie Fraser, Died Sept 2nd 1957, Aged 52 years. Also his wife Trixie Irene, Died Oct 16th 2008, Aged 87 years. Love's Last Token".[115] In 12/1885, then in Primer Class, Timaru Side School, she was given an award for conduct.[140] Cissie was a shop assistant,[64,113] after leaving school.[113] Married Alexander Fraser,[64] 14/1/1903,[66,113] at her parents' home, Craigie Ave, Timaru, New Zealand.[113] Alexander, a jeweller & watchmaker, was born 5/1/1875, Pine Hill, Dunedin, New Zealand & died 23/8/1928, Timaru, New Zealand (53yo).[64,113,114,115]
Children: (a)
 
Lily Fraser, born 1904, Timaru, New Zealand.[114] {No further record and not mentioned by [113], possibly died in infancy}
(b)
John Douglas Fraser, born 24/1/1905, Timaru, New Zealand.[64,113,114] Died 2/8/1957, Timaru, New Zealand.[64,115] Cause of death was complications from polio.[113] Jeweller & watchmaker,[64] established the Fraser Jewelers Shop in Timaru which continued for 3 generations.[113] Married Trixie Irene Osborne, 30/6/1943, Christchurch, New Zealand.[64] Trixie born 24/7/1921, Christchurch, New Zealand,[64] died 16/10/2008 (87yo).[115] Both John & Trixie were in the NZ Air Force during WWII.[113] Resided 1946-1954, No.4 College Road, Timaru, New Zealand.[113] Resided 1954-1957, Geraldine, near Timaru, New Zealand.[113] Had issue.[113]
ix.Margaret Ann Irwin, born 7/6/1881,[63,64,113,114] Timaru, New Zealand.[57,113] {Source [57] gives the dob as 2/6/1881} Died 9/7/1968, Timaru, New Zealand,[113,115] & buried 10/7/1968, Block G, Plot 299, General Section, Timaru Cemetery, Timaru, New Zealand (87yo).[113,115] "In loving memory of Gavin, dearly beloved husband of Margaret Moffat, who passed away on March 21st 1924, Aged 52. 'Sadly missed.' Margaret Anne Moffat, Died July 9th 1968, aged 87".[115] {Note the tombstone has the spelling Anne however all other records give the spelling Ann} Married Gavin Moffat,[64] 13/3/1907, New Zealand.[66] Gavin born 1873, Scotland,[113] died 21/3/1924 & buried with his wife, 22/3/1924, Timaru Cemetery, Timaru, New Zealand (52yo).[113,115] Resided No.24 Craigie Avenue, Timaru, New Zealand (dates not given), operating her house as a boarding house after her husband died.[113] No issue.[113]
x.Caroline Alice Irwin, born 23/5/1885,[63,20,65,113,114] Craigie Avenue, Timaru, New Zealand.[64,113] Died 14/12/1920,[63,64,65,113] and buried 16/12/1920, Block G, Plot 370, General Section, Timaru Cemetery, New Zealand (35yo).[65,115] "In loving Memory of Alice Beloved Wife of C. J. Lennon".[115] Cause of death was tuberculosis.[113] Enrolled Timaru Main School 24/5/1885 & was school dux, 1897.[113] Married Coway John Lennon,[64,65,122] 21/10/1908,[66,113,114] at her parents home, Craigie Avenue, Timaru, New Zealand.[113] Conway born 1880,[65,113] Orepuki, New Zealand,[113] died 4/3/1924, Timaru, New Zealand,[65] & buried 6/3/1924, with his wife, Timaru Cemetery, New Zealand (43yo).[115] Cause of death was tuberculosis.[113] Conrad was a clerk with the railways, eventually becoming a stationmaster.[113]
Children: (a)
 
John 'Jack' Webster Lennon,[64] born 14/8/1914, Auckland, New Zealand.[113] Died 24/2/2000, Christchurch, New Zealand.[113] Raised by his aunt, Margaret Moffat (nee Irwin).[113] RNZAF, 1941-1945.[113] Accountant, Lane Walker Rudkin, 1945.[113] Secretary of the LWR Group of Companies for 33 years.[113] Director, 1956,LWR Group of Companies.[113] Chairman, Dominion Yarns & Fabrics.[113] Married Joyce Lorraine Amyes, 26/9/1942, Timaru, New Zealand.[113] Resided 1945-2000, Christchurch, New Zealand.[113] Had issue.[113]

   
Elizabeth Irwin Jr
Elizabeth Irwin Jr
Image - Robert Irwin IV
Catherine irwin
Catherine Irwin
Image - Robert Irwin IV
William George Irwin
William George Irwin
Image - Robert Irwin IV
Archibald Irwin
Archibald Irwin
Image - Robert Irwin IV
Thomas Irwin
Thomas Irwin
Image - Robert Irwin IV
     
Cissie Irwin
Cissie Irwin
Image - Robert Irwin IV
Margaret Irwin
Margaret Irwin
Image - Robert Irwin IV
Caroline Alice Irwin
Caroline Alice Irwin
Image - Robert Irwin IV
Robert & Elizabeth Irwin, c1910
Robert & Elizabeth, c1910
Image - Robert Irwin IV
Daughters of Robert Irwin
Daughters of Robert Irwin
Image - Robert Irwin IV
   
Robert Irwin's family
Robert Irwin's family
Image - Robert Irwin IV
Thomas, Edith, Arthur, Annie & Marjorie Irwin
Thomas, Edith, Arthur, Annie & Marjorie Irwin
Image - Robert Irwin IV
Irwin Family Plot,Timaru cemetery
Irwin Family Plot,Timaru cemetery
Image © Timaru Cemetery
 
Robert Irwin's family - Back row: Archibald, Lizzie, Thomas; Middle row: Robert (II), Catherine, Elizabeth, Cissy, Robert (I), Margaret; Front: Alice.
   
Archibald & Catherine Irwin's homestead, Cavey
One of the Irwin farms, Cavey, Co Tyrone
Image © Robert Irwin
Lake Tekapo & Church of Good Shepherd
Lake Tekapo & Church of Good Shepherd
Image © Alpine Vistas NZ
59 Craigie Ave, Timaru
59 Craigie Ave, Timaru
Image - Robert Irwin IV
   
Lake Tekapo was one of the first settlements in the vast Mackenzie basin; a high country plain situated at the foot of the Southern Alps - New Zealand's largest mountain range. Located approximately halfway between Christchurch and Queenstown, the township is at the base of Lake Tekapo - a lake famous for its unusual azure colour - and at the foot of Mt Cook, New Zealand's talest mountain. The area today still has many high country sheep stations. The amazing turquoise blue colour of the lake is created by 'rock flour' which is created when the glaciers in the headwaters grind the rock into fine dust. These suspended particles in combination with the sunlight create the unique water colour. The lake never freezes, despite its high altitude. 'Tekapo' is a Maori word meaning night sleeping place. The Mackenzie basin was named for the infamous sheep rustler who roamed the high country sheep stations with his faithful dog. In 1865 James Mackenzie, of sheep stealing fame, found the pass used by Maoris to gain access to the interior country that now bears his name, while seeking a less conspicuous route for his flock. John Sidebottom, the man responsible for McKenzie’s arrest, lodged the first lease application in the basin but failed to take up the 30,000 hectares within the six-month requirement. The lease was cancelled and the land was divided up among other runholders. Within ten years the whole of the Mackenzie Basin, totalling 704,000 hectares, was taken up. In 1857 John and Barbara Hay established Tekapo Station, the first sheep farm in the Mackenzie, on the shores of Lake Tekapo. When the lake is low, remains of the homestead can be seen. An accommodation house was established in 1861, along with a ferry across the Tekapo River. Popular as ‘bullocky’ resting place, it became well known throughout the district. In 1881 the foundations of the first bridge were laid. In 1935 the Duke of Gloucester laid the foundation stone for the Church of the Good Shepherd to commemorate the pioneers of the Mackenzie Country.[Alpine Vista, Lake Tekaop, NZ Parks]
     
Timaru High School, late 1800's
Timaru High School, late 1800's
Image - Museum of New Zealand
Timaru, 1898
Timaru, 1898
Image - New Zealand Cyclopaedia, 1898
Stafford Street, Timaru, looking south, 1898
Stafford Street, Timaru, looking south, 1898
Image - New Zealand Cyclopaedia, 1898
    
Timaru is a major port city in the southern Canterbury region of New Zealand (actually it is the only city and port in the region), located 160 kilometres south of Christchurch, on the east coast of the South Island. In 2006 the district had a population of  42,867 & 27,200 in Timaru City. The region includes a prosperous agricultural hinterland & numerous smaller rural communities. Timaru has been constructed on rolling hills created from the lava flows of the extinct Mt Horrible volcano, which last erupted many thousands of years ago. The result is that most of the main streets are undulating, a clear contrast with the flat landscape of the Canterbury Plains to the north. This volcanic rock is used for the construction of local "bluestone" buildings. The origin of the name 'Timaru' is uncertain. Some suggest that it derives from the Maori 'Te Maru', which can mean a 'place of shelter'. However, others suggest that the name comes from a literal translation of the combination of ti, a cabbage tree and maru, meaning 'shady'. Archaeological evidence indicates that Maori tribes were permanently settled in the district before 1400 AD. European settlement began with the construction of a whaling station in 1839 by the Weller brothers of Otago at Patiti Point, close to the present town centre. A supply ship, The Caroline, provided the name for a local bay. Later a sheep station, known as The Levels, was created on land purchased by the Rhodes brothers. They used the sheltered shore at Timaru, the site of an abandoned whaling station, to land stores and ship away wool. Timaru’s first building was a cottage on the beach, and the first permanent inhabitant was Sam Williams, the whaler who introduced George Rhodes to South Canterbury. In 1856 Timaru consisted of only one accommodation house, and a woolshed, with a hotel on the beach. Few lived in Timaru until 1859 when the ship SS Strathallan arrived from England, carrying 120 immigrants. Persistent land disputes arose between the brothers and local government officials with the result that two townships were established in the port area, Government Town and Rhodestown. They were joined by a further 360 immigrants between 1862 and 1863. By 1866 the town had a population of 1,000, and it became a borough in 1868. Farming began in the 1860s and in 1864 the first wheat in South Canterbury was cut. Settlement on the agricultural land surrounding the town proceeded steadily, but for a considerable time the population in Timaru itself was small, and the buildings comparatively few in number. The main street, Stafford Street, was the only part of the town in which business places were erected, and these were built of wood. Timaru experienced a heavy flood in February, 1868, when people in the low lying portion of the town had to be rescued in boats, and the country round was in a more or less devastated condition. In December of the same year there was a fire, which in little more than an hour, destroyed forty buildings and property valued at £80,000. Nearly all the business places in the main thoroughfare were swept away. The two towns eventually merged into a single community in 1868. Given this division, until recently none of the main north-south streets lined up. Stafford Street, which became the main thoroughfare, was formed along the early bullock wagon trail. By the late 1860s Timaru’s leaders realised the landing services, which required double-handling of cargo, were restricting the port’s growth. They initiated plans for an artificial harbour to provide wharves and a safe haven for ships. Following the loss of a number of vessels off the coast, work started on the redevelopment in 1878 with the construction of the 700-metre southern breakwater. In the late 1880s, the north breakwater was built to keep sand shoals out of the harbour. Between 1899 and 1906 the eastern extension of the main breakwater was completed, preventing shingle drifting north into the harbour. During the 20th century the breakwaters were extended, realigned and raised. This was the beginning of the extensive land reclamation around the Caroline Bay district, an area which is still growing today. Timaru continued to expand during the 20th century, with much of the development taking the form of wooden colonial style bungalows set in individual sections of land. The building of the harbour changed the coastline at Timaru dramatically. Shingle accumulated south of the harbour, and this new area was used for grain and wool stores and oil tanks. North of the harbour, sand piled up at the foot of clay cliffs to form the beach of Caroline Bay. The population doubled in the 1870s, then stagnated. But from 1896 until 1911 there was relatively high growth, linked to increased farming in the region. In 1901 the borough had a population of 6424. Timaru became a city in 1948. Timaru owes its size and prosperity to its port. Initially, ships anchored in the shelter of basalt reefs. Their goods were carried ashore by boats and offloaded in a landing service (a large shed). The first landing service was opened in 1858 at the bottom of Strathallan Street. It was bought by the government in the mid-1860s and used for the first shipment of wool direct to England. Entrepreneurs later set up a private service in competition. The George Street landing service building is one of Timaru’s oldest structures.[Wikipedia, Te Ara, Cyclopedia of NZ]
     
Timaru Public School, late 1800's
Timaru Public School, late 1800's
Image - Museum of New Zealand
Timaru Presbyterian Church, 1889
Timaru Trinity Presbyterian Church, late 1800's
Image - Museum of New Zealand
Stafford St, Timaru, late 1800's
Stafford St, Timaru, late 1800's
Image - William Ferrier [Early NZ Postcards]
    
Timaru Boys' High School was established in 1878 & opened in February, 1882, with Mr. A. L. Halkett Dawson, M.A., as its first rector. Until 1897 boys and girls were taught at the school, although they were kept apart except in the highest classes, in which they were taught together for the sake of convenience. In that year a large portion of the Building was destroyed by fire, and since then the Girls' High School has existed as a separate institution. Dawson was succeeded in 1889 by George Hogben, M.A., and in 1899 by George Simmers, M.A. In the early 1900's the school was an imposing building of semi-classical style, standing on an eminence, in about eight acres of ground, south-west of the town, with it's own football and cricket ground, fives-court, a carpenter's workshop, a library, a gymnasium and a physical and chemical laboratory. The Girls' High School, Timaru, was established as a separate institution in December, 1897. Miss M. J. McLean, M.A., was the first headmistress, and she was succeeded in 1900 by Barbara Watt, M.A. The Timaru Main School (primary) occupied the square block between Arthur & North St's, and was established in the early 1870's. Built of Timaru stone, in 1900 there were 13 class rooms & provided accommodation for 700 pupils. The average attendance was about 650; including the headmaster the staff numbers fifteen teachers. The Timaru South Public School, which was originally a side school, was established independently in 1895, and stands upon an acre of land at the corner of King and Queen Streets. In 1900 the building, which was of brick and roofed with iron, contained three class rooms and two porches, with accommodation for 250 pupils. The number on the roll was about 230 and the average attendance about 200. The headmaster was assisted by two mistresses, and two pupil-teachers. A good playground surrounded the school, and there was a seven roomed residence, with a verandah, for the teacher in charge.[Cyclopedia of NZ]
     
Archibald Irwin's grave,Timaru cemetery
Archibald Irwin's grave,Timaru cemetery
Image © Timaru Cemetery
Timaru, 1875
Timaru, 1875
Image - Timaru Herald
Napier after 1931 Earthquake
Napier after 1931 Earthquake
Image - Historic Earthquakes of NZ
   
Otaio is the name of a small settlement, and also of a riding of the Waimate county; at the census of 1901 the riding had a population of 535. In 1900 the district had a public school, and the business of the post office was conducted at the local smithy. The flag station on the railway line stands eighteen feet above sea level, and is 114 miles distant from Christchurch, fourteen from Timaru, and four from St. Andrews. Otaio lies between the river of that name and the Makakihi river. The country generally is fertile and undulating, and is devoted chiefly to sheep-farming. Otaio is noted for the fineness of its climate. Otaio Post Office was established about 1887. In 1900 it was conducted at the local smithy, but was for some years conducted at the railway station. Mr. William George Irwin, Postmaster at Otaio, was born in Timaru, in 1868. He had been in business at Otaio since 1894, and has acted as postmaster since then. The Otaio Public School was established in the early 1870's, and was one of the oldest schools in the district. In 1900 it stood on a glebe of two acres, and had room for fifty children; the number on the roll being thirty-two, and the average attendance, twenty-eight.[Cyclopedia of NZ] The 1931 Hawke's Bay earthquake, also known as the Napier earthquake, occurred in New Zealand at 10:47 am on Tuesday February 3, 1931, killing 256 and devastating the Hawke's Bay region. Centred 15 km north of Napier, it lasted for two and a half minutes and measured about 7.8 on the Richter scale (7.9 on the moment magnitude scale). There were 525 aftershocks recorded in the following two weeks. The main shock could be felt in much of the lower half of the North Island. Nearly all buildings in the central areas of Napier and Hastings were levelled (The Dominion noted that "Napier as a town has been wiped off the map") and the death toll included 161 people in Napier, 93 in Hastings, and two in Wairoa. Thousands more were injured, with over 400 hospitalised. The local landscape changed dramatically, with the coastal areas around Napier being lifted by around two metres. Some 40 km≤ of sea-bed became dry land, where the airport, housing and industrial property developments now exist. The most noticeable land change was the uplifting of the Ahuriri Lagoon. The lagoon was lifted more than 2.7 metres, which resulted in draining 2230 hectares of the lagoon. Today, the area is where farmland and the Hawkes Bay Airport is located. Within minutes fires broke out in chemist shops in Hastings Street. The fire brigade almost had the first fire under control when the second broke out in a shop at the back of the Masonic Hotel. The hotel was quickly engulfed in flames. The wind at this point also picked up strength and began blowing from the east, pushing the fires back over the city. With water mains broken the brigade was unable to save many buildings. Pumping water from Clive Square they were able to stop the fires spreading South. Only a few buildings in the central Napier area survived. Some withstood the earthquake only to be gutted by fire. Trapped people had to be left to burn as people were unable to free them in time. By Wednesday morning the main fires were out but the ruins still smouldered for several days. The Napier Daily Telegraph had recently celebrated its diamond jubilee with an article describing Napier as "the Nice of the Pacific". The newspaper office was destroyed by the quake. The Hawke's Bay Herald offices in Hastings were also destroyed.[Wikipedia]
     
2-4 College Road, Timaru
2-4 College Road, Timaru
Image © Google Streetview
18 Craigie Avenue, Timaru
18 Craigie Avenue, Timaru
Image © Google Streetview
24 Craigie Avenue, Timaru
24 Craigie Avenue, Timaru
Image © Google Streetview
   
   

1.1.5.1.1. Robert Irwin (s/o Robert, Archibald, s/o Thomas), born 13/11/1871, [9,11,57,59,63,64,113] Timaru, New Zealand.[64] Died 29/3/1932 (60yo),[59,64,113,114] Durie Hill, Wanganui, New Zealand,[64,113] & buried Aramaho Cemetery, Wanganui, New Zealand.[113] "In Loving Memory, Robert Irwin, 1871-1932, And his Beloved Wife, Annie Margaret, 1875-1961, Interred at Karori Cemetery. Also his son Archibald Havelock, Lost on the 'Windward', 1906-1931. Gone Before".[113] {Was the 5th child of his parents, but the oldest child to have any children} In 12/1878, then in infants class, was given an award for good conduct, Timaru Public School.[136] On 30/1/1882 Robert was admitted to the Timaru Main School, having graduated from the Timaru Side School; he remained in the Main School until 15/11/1885.[57] In 11/1882 & again in 12/1882, then in Standard IV, Timaru Main School, he received a
Robert Irwin (1871-1932)
Robert Irwin (1871-1932)
Image
- Robert Irwin IV
commendation.[138] In 12/1885, then in Standard VI, Timaru Main School, he was awarded 2nd place in Proficiency.[140] In 1887 Robert Jr was in his first year of studies to be a music teacher, under Mr Bilton, taking his exams around 5/8/1887, "Tested on Reading in Time, 2-4, 3-4, and common time, intervals, expression reading notations and beating time, ability to sing in tune and with expression, inversion,"[69] passing his 1st year exam with a mark of 414 out of 710.[134] He passed his 2nd year Pupil Teacher Examinations in 1888, with a mark of 555 out of 710, the highest mark for a 2nd year student that year and he was singled out to "deserve great praise for [his] paper".[133] In 1887 he was employed at Timaru Main School as a student teacher, on a salary of £25 per year.[113] In 1889 he was still employed as a student teacher at Timaru Main School, then on £82 per year.[113] On the 3/11/1890, having passed his fourth year pupil teacher examinations & having been appointed master of the Rangitata South School, Robert tendered his resignation to the Timaru School Committee, asking to be relieved of his duties at Timaru Main School on the 7/11/1890.[135] He also "requested that, as he had been 13 years in the school, 8 as a scholar and 5 as a pupil teacher, the committee would give him a testimonial. The acceptance of the resignation to be recommended, and the secretary was authorised to comply with his request for a testimonial. On the suggestion of the headmaster it was resolved to recommend Miss Edith Sunnaway for appointment as pupil teacher to make up the number."[135] In 1891, after graduating, he took up employment at a one-teacher school at Rangitata, on an annual salary of £114.[113] {Rangitata is 39km north of Timaru, on the railway line} By 1893 his annual salary had risen to £123 and he had employed his sister, Elizabeth, as an assistant at a salary of £12/year.[113] In 1895, on a salary of £127/year, he was teaching 30 students.[113] In 1895 "A complimentary social to Mr Robert Irwin was given by the members of the Pakihi Debating Society last Friday evening (18/1/1895). The gathering took place at the Newlands homestead, which Mr Robert Taylor kindly placed at the disposal of the society. There was a large attendance, and dancing was kept up till daylight, Mr Bissett acting as M.C., and Messrs Cadwallader (violin), and Irwin (piano), supplying the music. During the evening songs were rendered by Messrs Glanville, Irwin, and Hawke, and Misses Woodley, Pye, Charteris and Donn. Mr Irwin was also the recipient of a beautiful table and writing desk, which were given by the children of the Pakihi school. The presentation was made by Mr J. Naughton, and Mr Irwin feelingly thanked all the friends who had gathered together to do him honour, and the children for their beautiful present."[139] In 1898 Robert was on an annual salary of £143/year and employed an assistant teacher, Mary Wharton, & his sister, Elizabeth, as a sewing teacher on £12/year.[113] That year he obtained a partial pass for his Class D teacher examinations.[137] In 1904 Robert & his family moved to Lyell where he was headmaster, earning £158/year and employed his wife Annie Margaret ('Maggie').[113,122] In 1906 Robert & family were at Havelock, where he salary had risen to £195/year.[113] Robert's next place of employment was the school at Riwaka, where he remained for about 6 years & his salary rose to £235/year.[113] In 1909 it was noted "Riwaka has its miniature port of call, its public school and sweet intelligent children under the able tuition of Mr Robert Irwin. Everything is done to make school life pleasant and evidently with good results. The attendance for the last year being 92% of the roll muster."[113] Many schools today would be proud to claim a 92% attendance rate! In 1914 Robert moved to Nelson so his oldest sons could attend college there, he was employed as an assistant headmaster at the Tasman Street & Brook Street Schools, his salary rising to £435/year by 1923.[113] In that year he was appointed headmaster of Hampden Street School, next to Nelson College.[113] Robert's last school (1924-1927) was Queens Park School, Wanganui, where he was the head teacher, a school chosen to be near his eldest son, who was in a sanatorium in Wanganui, suffering TB.[113] Married Annie Margaret Munro,[11] 6/4/1896,[59,70,113,114] Trinity Presbyterian Church, Timaru, New Zealand, by Rev. W. Gillies.[70] "At the Trinity Presbyterian Church, Timaru, on April 6th, 1896, by the Rev. W. Gillies, Robert, third son of Robert Irwin, Timaru, to Annie Margaret, eldest daughter of Donald Munro, Esq., Dalmore farm, Kingsdown."[70] Margaret was the eldest daughter of Donald Munro, Esq., of Dalmore farm, Kingsdown,[70] born 19/4/1875, Moeraki, Otago district, New Zealand, died 10/11/1961, Karori, Wellington, New Zealand,[64,113] & buried Plot 18Z/2, Karori Lawn Cemetery, Karori, New Zealand.[113] At the time of the marriage Maggie was a student teacher at Kingsdown.[113] Resided 1884-1891, Timaru, New Zealand.[113] Resided 1891-1901, Rangitata Station, near Timaru, New Zealand.[68,113] Resided 1904, Lyell, Buller Gorge, New Zealand.[113] Resided 1906, Havelock, New Zealand.[59,64,113,114] Resided 1907-1913, Riwaka, New Zealand.[59,64,113,114] Resided 1914-1923, Nelson, New Zealand.[11,64,113] Resided 1924-1932, No.11 Maxwell Avenue, Durie Hill, Wanganui, New Zealand.[113] Resided (Maggie) 1932-1961, No.32 Ponsonby Road, Karori, Wellington, New Zealand.[113]

Children of Robert & Annie Margaret Irwin:
i.
 
Robert Cyril Munro Irwin,[59,64] born 5/5/1897, Rangitata Station, Timaru, New Zealand.[59,64,68,113,114] "At West Town Belt, Timaru, on May 5th, the wife of Robert Irwin, of Rangitata Station, of a son."[68] Died 16/8/1925,[59,64,113,118] Waipukurau, New Zealand,[113] & buried 18/5/1925, Row WW1, Block RSA, Plot 19, Waipukurau Cemetery, Central Hawkes Bay, New Zealand (28yo).[118] "77559 Pte R. C. M. Irwin, Training Unit, New Zealand Expeditionary Forces, Died 16-8-1925, Aged 28".[118] Cause of death was tuberculosis.[113] Employed by the Lands & Survey Department, 1917-1919.[113] Was drafted into the army, 1919.[113] During training he contracted tuberculosis & was confined to a sanatorium at Pukeora, near Waipukurau, New Zealand, where he remained until his death.[113,122] Did not marry.[64]
ii.

Donald Leolin 'Leo' Irwin,[59,64] born 8/10/1899, Rangitata Station, Timaru, New Zealand.[59,64,71,113,114] "At Timaru on the 8th inst., the wife of Robert Irwin, Rangitata, of a son."[71] Died 31/5/1966,[59,64,113] Wellington Hospital, Wellington, New Zealand,[64,113] buried 3/6/1966, Plot 393B, Karori Cemetery, Wellington, New Zealand.[113,119] Cause of death was heart failure.[113] Attended Nelson College, 1914-1917.[113] In 1917 found employment as an apprentice office assistant at Dominion Farmers Institute.[113] In 1919 he was appointed office assistant & bookkeeper at the Farmers Institute.[113] In 1934 was appointed General Manager of the firm Rubber Distributors Ltd, Wellington, remaining with the company until the early 1950s.[113] Masters of Commerce, 1936.[113] Part-time lecturer, accountancy, Victoria University.[113] In 1953 founded Delta Trading Company Ltd, which imported & manufactured gramaphone recordings.[113,122] Leo was an amateur classical musician and sponsored several national tours of world-famous classical musicians and singers.[113] Public accountant.[64] Married 1st Mildred Blanche Godier,[59,64] 16/1/1923,[64,113,114] Kent Terrace Presbyterian Church, Wellington, New Zealand.[64,113] Mildred was born 23/9/1898,[59,64,113] Chelmsford Rd, West Ham, Sussex, England,[64] and died 30/3/1973,[59,64] No.13 Oban St, Wadestown, Wellington, New Zealand.[64] Mildred was a musician.[64] Divorced 17/12/1936.[113] Married 2nd Claribel Cletis 'Chad' Thomson,[59] 27/7/1937, St John's Presbyterian Church, Wellington, New Zealand.[64,113] Chad was born 17/4/1910,[59,64,113] Wellington, New Zealand,[64] died 21/9/1996,[59,64] Wellington, New Zealand,[64] & her ashes interred with her husband.[113] Cause of death was a stroke.[113] Chad was Leo's secretary at prior to their marriage.[64,113] Resided 1917, No.32 Upper Rate Road, Hataitai, New Zealand.[113] Resided 1918-1966, Wellington, New Zealand.[113] Resided 1938-1966, No.24 Calcutta Street, Khandallah, Wellington, New Zealand.[113]
Children: (a)
 
Marie Mildred Irwin, born 3/1/1926, Lyall Bay, Wellington, New Zealand.[64,113] Died 13/4/2007, Mercy Hospice, Auckland, New Zealand.[64] Cause of death was cancer.[113] Bachelor Arts (Education), University of New Zealand, Wellington.[113] Master of Arts (Education), 1948, PhD (Education), 1966.[113] Honorary PhDs Lesley College, Massachusetts, USA (1967), Ohio State University (1988), University of London (2002), Purdue University (2002).[113] Assistant psychologist, NZ Department of Education, 1948-1950.[113] Studied child psychology, University of Minnesota, USA, 1950-1953.[113] Teacher, Wanganui, New Zealand, 1953-1955.[113] Psychological Services, Department of Education, 1955-1960.[113] Education Department, Auckland University, 1960-1985.[113] Professor, Education Department, University of Auckland, 1975.[113] Awarded Mackie Medal in Education, 1983, from Australian & NZ Association for Advancement of Science.[113] Dame Commander of the British Empire, 1987.[113] President, International Literacy Association, 1992-1993 (1st non-American to hold the position).[113] Awarded Dana Award for Pioneering Achievements in Education, 1993.[113] New Zealander of the Year, 1994.[113]
Marie's obituary published in the New York Times, read: "Marie M. Clay, an internationally known educator who developed a remedial reading program known as Reading Recovery, which has been used with millions of children around the world, died last Friday in Auckland, New Zealand. She was 81 and lived in Auckland. Ms. Clay died after a brief illness, said the Reading Recovery Council of North America, which announced the death in the United States. Ms. Clay was an emeritus professor of education at the University of Auckland, where she had taught since the early 1960s. Reading Recovery focuses on first-grade students who are having difficulty learning to read. It offers them a series of one-on-one daily lessons with a trained tutor, for 12 to 20 weeks. Inaugurated in New Zealand in the 1970s, Reading Recovery has been used with more than 1.6 million children in the United States since it was introduced here in 1984, the North American organization said. It is used in several other English-speaking countries, including Canada, Australia and Britain. The program has a Spanish version, used in the United States; a French version, used in Canada; and a Danish version. Ms. Clay’s many books include “Becoming Literate: The Construction of Inner Control,” Heinemann, 1991; “Concepts About Print: What Have Children Learned About the Way We Print Language?” Heinemann, 2000; and “Change Over Time in Children’s Literacy Development,” Heinemann, 2001. Marie Mildred Irwin was born on Jan. 3, 1926, in Wellington, New Zealand. (Her given name is pronounced MAH-ree, with the stress on the first syllable.) She earned a bachelors degree in education from the University of New Zealand in 1946 and a masters degree in education in 1948. She studied clinical child psychology at the University of Minnesota in the early 1950s and earned a doctorate in education from the University of Auckland in 1966. She taught elementary and special education in New Zealand, and was a school psychologist there, before joining the University of Auckland faculty. Her marriage to Warwick Clay ended in divorce. She is survived by a brother, Robert Irwin of Auckland; a sister, Lorraine Christie of Wellington; two children, Alan Clay of Wanganui, New Zealand, and Jenny Clay of Auckland; and three grandchildren. Ms. Clay, a past president of the International Reading Association, was widely honored for her work. She was made a Dame Commander of the British Empire in 1987."[121]
Married Warwick Victor Clay, 14/6/1952, Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota, USA.[64,113] Warwick born 6/6/1924, Auckland, New Zealand,[64] and died 8/7/2007.[113] Warwick was a civil engineer.[64] Resided 1926-1950, Wellington, New Zealand.[113] Resided 1950-1953, Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota, USA.[113] Resided 1953-1955, Wanganui, New Zealand.[113] Resided 1955-2007, Bassett Road, Remuera, Auckland, New Zealand.[113] Had issue.[113]
(b)
Robert Wilson Irwin IV, born 19/11/1939, Wellington, New Zealand.[64,113] Died 20/10/2010, Auckland, New Zealand.[67] Cause of death was bone cancer.[67] Khandallah School, 1945-1952.[113] Nelson College, 1953-1957.[113] Canterbury University, 1958-1961, BE (Civil).[113] Chartered Engineer, 1966.[113] Employed Wellington City Council Streetworks Department, 1962.[113] Wellington City Council Structural Engineering Department, 1963.[113] Engineer with Conrad Zschokke SA, Geneva, Switzerland, 1963-1966.[113] CEO, Construction Techniques Group Ltd (subsidiary of Conrad Zschokke), 1967-1985.[113] CEO & owner, Construction Techniques Group Ltd, 1985-1999.[113] Civil engineer.[64] Married Judith Mary Campbell, 1/12/1962, Waiwhetu Presbyterian Church, Lower Hutt, New Zealand.[64,113] Judith, a nurse, born 6/8/1939, Blenheim, New Zealand.[64,113] Resided 1962, Kilbirnie, Wellington, New Zealand.[113] Resided 1963-1966, Geneva, Switzerland.[113] Resided 1966-1978, Masterton, New Zealand.[113] Resided 1978-1993, Remuera, Auckland, New Zealand.[113] Resided 1993-2010, Orakei, Auckland, New Zealand.[113] Had issue.[113]
(c)Lorraine Irwin, born 17/2/1942, Wellington, New Zealand.[64,113] Married Richard Gordon Maxwell Christie,[64] 30/1/1965, Khandallah Presbyterian Church, Khandallah, Wellington, New Zealand.[113] Richard born 16/6/1943, Wellington, New Zealand.[64] Had issue.[113]
iii.

Annie Margaret Ethel Irwin, born 16/6/1901, Rangitata Station, Timaru, New Zealand.[59,64,113,114] Died 16/8/1981 (80yo),[59,64,113] Lower Hutt, New Zealand,[64,113] & buried Naenae Cemetery, Lower Hutt, New Zealand.[113] Contracted tuberculosis around 1940 & spent several years in a sanatorium in Newtown, Wellington.[113] Although she recovered, she suffered lung problems for the rest of her life.[113] Teacher.[64,113] Married Dunlop Brown,[59,64] 17/5/1930, Kelburn Presbyterian Church, Wellington, New Zealand.[64,113] Dunlop born 5/9/1902, Les Mahoge, Lanarkshire, Scotland, died 15/10/1984,[59,64,113] Lower Hutt, New Zealand,[64] & buried with his wife.[113] Orchardist.[64,113] Resided Waterloo Road, Lower Hutt, New Zealand.[113]
Children: (a)
 
Denis Dunlop Brown, born 27/10/1932, Nelson, New Zealand.[64,113] Died 30/7/1991, London, England.[64] Salesman & sales manager.[64,113] Married Waimarie Rangiuira Nepia, 12/3/1955, St James Church, Lower Hutt, NZ.[64] Waimarie born 19/10/1936 & died 23/10/1999 (63yo), Wellington, New Zealand.[64,113] Divorced.[113] Married Antonia Johanna van Heusden, 29/10/1965.[64,113] Antonia born 4/9/1935, Arnhem, Netherland.[113] Divorced.[113] Married Jenny Brown,[64] 31/7/1984, London, England.[113] Had issue.[113]
iv.

Lyell Ross Irwin, born 9/7/1904, Lyell, Buller Gorge, New Zealand.[59,64,113,114] Bank clerk.[64,113] Died 17/7/1941, Raumati South, New Zealand (37yo),[64,113] & buried 18/7/1941, Karori Cemetery.[113] Diagnosed with tuberculosis shortly after his marriage, his mother moved him to a cottage built by his brother Leo, deep in the bush at Otaki Forkes, not wanting him to end his life in a TB sanatorium (due to the number of family deaths from TB at sanatoriums, the family naturally developed a high degree of distrust for such places).[113] The attempt to save Lyell from TB was not successful and he was moved to a beach house at Raumati South in 1939 where he died a few years later.[113] Attended Nelson College, 1918-1919.[113] Married Marie Edna Burgess,[59,64,113] 30/8/1930.[64,113] Marie died 16/3/1991 & her ashes interred at Kelvin Grove Cemetery, Palmerston North, New Zealand.[113] Marie married 2nd to Leonard Curtis.[113]
Children: (a)
 
Archibald Ross Irwin, born 1934, Wanganui, New Zealand.[64] Died 6/3/1962, near Palmerston North, New Zealand.[64,113] Buried 8/3/1962, Kelvin Grove Cemetery, Palmerston North, New Zealand.[113] Cause of death was a car accident.[113] Primary school teacher.[64,113] Did not marry, no issue.[113]
v.

Archibald Havelock Irwin, born 25/7/1906, Havelock, New Zealand.[59,64,113,114] Died 6/1/1931,[59,64,113] while at sea on the yacht "Windward", which was never found.[64] Attended Nelson College, 1920-1924.[113] School teacher, 1925-1927.[113] Attended Victoria University (BSc), 1927-1930.[113] Shortly after completing his degree sailed to the Chatham Islands on the yacht "Windward", departing 24/12/1930.[113] He arrived safely, but the yacht was lost at sea on the return voyage with all hands.[113] The yacht was well equipped and the crew very experienced sailors, yet no trace of wreckage has ever been found and the fate of the Windward remains a total mystery.[113] Archie's degree was awarded posthumously in 1985.[113]
vi.
Eileen Riwaka Irwin, born 30/10/1907, Riwaka, New Zealand.[59,64,113,114] Died 4/6/1937 (30yo),[59,64,113] East Tamaki, Auckland, New Zealand & buried Presbyterian Church graveyard, East Tamaki, New Zealand.[64,113] Cause of death was tuberculosis.[113] Nurse.[64,113] Married Cecil Stanley Cornwall,[59,64] 17/5/1930, Kelburn Presbyterian Church, Wellington, New Zealand.[64] Cecil was born 2/4/1903, Hawera, New Zealand and died 24/1/1995, Middlemore Hospital, Auckland, New Zealand (91yo).[64,113] Cecil was working at a cheese factory at the time of their marriage, an occupation he remained in until the late 1930s.[113] After Eileen's death Cecil changed jobs, finding work as a brewer with the Waitemata Brewery, where he remained until his retirement in the 1960s.[113] Resided 1930-1934, Thames, New Zealand.[113] Resided 1935, East Tamaki, Auckland, New Zealand.[113]
Children: (a)
 
Bruce Leolin Cornwall, born 24/4/1931, Thames, New Zealand.[64,113] Died 27/8/1990, Auckland Hospital, New Zealand.[64,122] Cause of death was cancer.[113] Dispatch manager, NZ Industrial Gases at Bendon & Sandvick, New Zealand, 1961 & on.[113] Married Shirley Iris Wood,[64,113] 1/4/1961, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.[113] Shirley born 6/10/1936, Papatoetoe, New Zealand.[113] Resided 1961-1967, Auckland, New Zealand.[113] Resided 1967-1990, Pakuranga, Auckland, New Zealand.[113] Had issue.[113]
(b)
John Bevin Cornwall, born 29/6/1932, Thames, New Zealand.[64,113] Technical trainee, Electronics Section, Auckland Division, NZ Department Scientific & Industrial Research, 1950-1955.[113] Electronics Engineer,[64] Electronics Section, Auckland Division, NZ Department Scientific & Industrial  Research, 1955-1965.[113] Head, Electronics Section, Auckland Division, NZ Department Scientific & Industrial Research, 1965-1970s.[113] Assistant Director, Auckland Division, NZ Department Scientific & Industrial Research, late 1970s.[113] Director, Auckland Division, NZ Department Scientific & Industrial Research, early 1980s - 1992.[113] Married Raewyn Francis Clarke, 4/4/1959, Church of St George, Church of England, Papatoetoe, New Zealand.[64,113] Resided 1959-1961, Howick, Auckland, New Zealand.[113] Resided 1961 & on, Cockle Bay, Auckland, New Zealand.[113] Had issue.[113]
(c)Robert Cecil Irwin Cornwall, born 20/2/1934, Thames, New Zealand.[64,113] Maintenance Engineer.[64,113] Married Violet Dawn Hall,[64] 8/9/1956 in Te Awamutu, New Zealand.[113,122] Violet born 10/3/1934.[113] Married Elaine Foster,[64] 19/9/1980, Papakura Courthouse, New Zealand.[113] Resided 1956-1960, Clevedon Road, Papakura, New Zealand.[113] Resided 1960-1981, Alma Crescent, Papakura, New Zealand.[113] Resided 1981 & on, Ohakune, New Zealand.[113] Had issue.[113]
vii.
Gordon Alexander Irwin, born 5/9/1910, Riwaka, New Zealand.[59,64,113] Died 22/5/1985 (74yo),[59,64,113] Hokianga Hospital, Rawene, Northland, New Zealand,[64,113] & buried Pakanae Cemetery, Hokianga, New Zealand.[113] Cause of death was bowel cancer.[113] Studied at Nelson College, 1923-1924, Wanganui College, 1924, Victoria University at Wellington, 1928, Otago University, 1929-1932, where he completed his medical degree.[113] Employed 1933, Auckland Hospital, 1934-1938 at Wanganui Hospital.[113] Wing Commander, Royal NZ Air Force, 1939-1945.[113] After the war Gordon & Aileen spent 4 years working in Western Samoa, he as Medical Director at the Public Hospital.[113] After his return to NZ Gordon practiced as a Medical Practitioner (GP).[59,64,113] Married Aileen Mary Cameron,[59,64] 11/4/1934, Wanganui, New Zealand.[64,113] Aileen, a nurse,[64] was born 10/6/1919,[59,64,113] Okaiawa, New Zealand and died 21/12/1987,[59,64] Opunake, New Zealand.[64] Resided 1939-1945, Whenuapai, New Zealand.[113] Resided 1945-1948, Western Samoa, Pacific Ocean.[113] Resided 1948 & later, Great South Road, Manurewa, New Zealand.[113] Resided No.60 Grande Vue Road, Manurewa, New Zealand.[113]
Children: (a)
 
Judith Margaret Ann Irwin, born 11/9/1948, Auckland, New Zealand.[64,113] {[64] incorrectly gives DOB of 1941Married Francis Robin Barnes, 15/10/1975, St Francis Church, Whangarei, Northland, New Zealand.[64,113] Had issue.[113]

viii.
Laura Evangeline 'Eve' Irwin,[9] born 28/5/1916, Nelson, New Zealand.[11,64,113] Died 27/6/1987,[9,67,113] Wellington Hospital, Wellington, New Zealand,[64,113] & buried 1/7/1987, Plot 18z/2, Karori Lawn Cemetery, Wellington, New Zealand.[113,119] BA, Victoria University, Wellington, 1937.[113] B.Music, 1972, Victoria University.[113] Taught at Newtown School, 1938, Wellington Boy's College, 1944, Karori Primary, 1955-1963.[64,113] Head of music at the Correspondence School, Wellington, 1964-1981.[113] Married Alan Frank Wilton,[9,11,67] 9/9/1939,[64,113] Kelburn Presbyterian Church, Wellington, New Zealand.[113] Alan born 20/8/1913, Wellington, New Zealand, died 25/2/1988, Wellington Hospital, New Zealand,[9,11,64,67] & buried 4/3/1988, Plot 18z/2, Karori Lawn Cemetery, Wellington, New Zealand.[119] Alan served as a sergeant in the NZ Expeditionary Force, 11/1940 until the end of the war.[113] He was wounded in battle at Sidi Rezegh, after his recovery he spent the remainder of the war in the NZ Army pay office in Cairo.[113] After the war Alan took up the position of secretary to the Wellington Hospital Board and subsequently Chief Executive Officer until his retirement in 1977.[113] Resided 1944 & later, No.11, Hurman Street, Karori,Wellington, New Zealand.[113] Resided 1973 & later, No.118, Wilton Road, Wilton (adjacent to the Wilton Reserve which had been part of the Wilton family since before 1860).[113]
Children: (a)
 
Richard Wilton,[9] born 27/5/1941,[64,113] Wellington, New Zealand.[11,67,113] Diploma teaching, 1966.[113] Bachelor Education.[113] Teacher, Otago Boys High School, 1967-1975.[113] Head of Science, Columbia College, 1976.[113] Blue Mountains College, 1977-1980.[113] Teacher & Assistant Principal, Westland High School, 1980-1997.[113] Jerudong International School, Brunei, 1998-2006.[113] School principal.[64] Married Josephine Elisabeth Purser, 22/1/1966, Knox Church, Dunedin, New Zealand.[64,113] Resided 1966, Waltham, Christchurch, New Zealand.[113] Resided 1967-1976, Bellevue Street, Dunedin, New Zealand.[113] Resided 1977-1980, Tapanui, New Zealand.[113] Resided 1980-1997, Hokitika, New Zealand.[113] Resided 1998-2006, Brunei.[113] Resided 2007 & on, Wanaka, New Zealand.[113] Has issue.[113]
(b)
John Robert Wilton,[9] born 12/12/1945,[64,113] Wellington, New Zealand.[11,67,113] Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand, 1964-1965.[113] Doughman, Denhard's bakery, Wellington, New Zealand, 1966.[113] Station hand & drover, various cattle stations, far north Queensland, Australia, 1967-1971.[113] Crew, prawn trawler, Karumba, north Queensland, Australia, 1969-1971 (wet season).[113] Farm hand, 1971-1973, Atherton Tablelands, Queensland, Australia.[113] Pedigree dog breeder, 1973-1975.[113] Pest control contractor, 1975-post 1995.[113] Pest controller.[64,67] Married Margaret Joan Cook, 5/5/1971, Herberton, Atherton Tablelands, Queensland, Australia.[64,113] Margaret born 1/11/1947, Wondal, Queensland, Australia.[113] Resided 1967-1971, Karumba region, north Queensland, Australia.[113] Resided 1971-1972, Herberton, Atherton Tablelands, Queensland, Australia.[113] Resided 1972-1980, Peeramon, Atherton Tablelands, Queensland, Australia.[113] Resided 1980-1984, Weipa, Queensland, Australia.[113] Resided 1984-1987, Cairns, Queensland, Australia.[113] Resided 1988 & on, Charters Towers, Queensland, Australia.[113] Had issue.[113]
(c)Peter Edward Wilton,[9] born 8/10/1950,[64,113] Wellington, New Zealand.[11,67,113] Principal oboist, Wellington Youth Orchestra, 1964.[113] Principal oboist, National Youth Orchestra, 1966.[113] NZBC Symphony Orchestra, 1970.[113] Berlin Symphony Orchestra, 1971-1988.[113] Consultant translator, 1988 & on.[113] Married Sabine Gabriele Schultz, 28/6/1974, Kelkheim, Taunus, Germany.[64,113] Sabine born 31/5/1943, Berlin, Germany.[113] Partner 2nd Karen Louise Lang, c.1981, Berlin, Germany.[64] Karen born 1/12/1951, Wellsville, NY, USA.[113] Had issue.[113]

     
Robert & Annie (Munro) Irwin, 1896
Robert & Annie Irwin, 1896
Image - Robert Irwin IV
George, Ada, Blanche & Marie Irwin
George, Ada, Blanche
& Marie Irwin

Image - Robert Irwin IV
Irwin family, 1916
Irwin family, 1916 (see below)
Image - Robert Irwin IV
School & schoolhouse, Lyell, Butler Gorge
School & schoolhouse, Lyell, Butler Gorge
Image - Robert Irwin IV

Irwin family photograph, taken 1916, Nelson, NZ: (Left to Right) Ross, Leo, Gordon, Robert Sr, Ethel, Eileen, Cyril, Annie, Archie & Eve.

Lyell school, Butler Gorge c.1898
Lyell school, Butler Gorge c.1898
Image - Robert Irwin IV
Cliff Street, Lyell, late 1800's
Cliff Street, Lyell, late 1800's
Image - Te Ara
Riwaka school house, Rbt & Annie Irwin, 1907
Riwaka school house, Robert Irwin's family, 1907
Image - Robert Irwin IV
    
Lyell was a thriving gold-mining town in the 1880s and 1890s, and a major stopping point on the winding road through the upper Buller Gorge in the South Island of New Zealand. The location is now a campsite maintained by the Department of Conservation. The town was abandoned by the middle of the 20th century and none of the original buildings remain but a track from the campsite leads to a cemetery and an old stamping battery. The township occupied a tiny strip of flat land near the mouth of Lyell Creek, named after Scottish geologist Charles Lyell. After mining ceased, a hotel remained and a small number of people continued to live at Lyell until the 1960s. The discovery of alluvial gold in late 1859 brought prospectors into Buller valley, although there was never a gold rush. Supplies were transported up the Buller River by boat. In 1869 Zala and Zanetti discovered gold-bearing quartz veins in a tributary of Lyell Creek. Underground exploration led to the discovery of a reef, the Alpine Mine, which produced gold from 1871 to 1912. From 1891 to 1911 a number of small gold dredges worked the middle section of the Buller River, between Blackwater River and Lyell. Gold returns were patchy, and dredges were often damaged or washed away by floods. Gold mining in the Buller valley had virtually ceased by the First World War. Although gold can still be found locally, no areas rich enough to work have been discovered. In the 1800s Lyell had a weekly newspaper & a branch of the National Bank of New Zealand, but with the decline of mining the paper ceased, and the bank was closed. At the census of 1901, the total population of the riding of Lyell was 308, and of the township itself, ninety. The township stands on the side of a hill, which rises abruptly from the Buller river. By the early 1900's the Warden's Court still sat periodically at Lyell, where there was also a police station. There were two churches, a public school, which was attended by about forty children, three hotels and two stores in the township.[Wikipedia, Te Ara, Cyclopaedia of NZ] Riwaka is in the Tasman District. The first settlers arrived from Nelson in the 1840s. By the 1850s, stock had arrived and mixed farming got underway. The local school, built in 1848, operates on its original site and the Riwaka Hotel, built in 1854, is a town landmark. The original two-storey wooden building still stands. In the 1890s sawmilling was a major industry in Riwaka. The milled timber was shipped to Nelson from Riwaka Wharf. By the end of the 19th Centruy, hop growing began, and later Riwaka developed its well-known tobacco industry. In 1901 the district had a population of about 700 persons, and the land, which was subdivided into small holdings, was of excellent quality, and suitable for farming of all kinds. The soil is also specially adapted for growing small fruits of all kinds, including currants, raspberries and strawberries. Sheep and cattle also thrived in the district.[Cyclopaedia of NZ, Tasman District Council]
     
Riwaka Street School, 1880's
Riwaka Street School, 1880's
Image - Riwaka School
Hampden Street School, Nelson
Hampden Street School, Nelson
Image - Nelson Provincial Museum
Site of former Queens Park School, Wanganui
Site of former Queens Park School, Wanganui
Image ©  Whanganui Library
    
Hampden Street School is one of the oldest primary schools in Nelson City and has occupied the same site since 1868. The traditional motto is "Honestos Summa Sapientia" Honesty and Wisdom Above All. The original school was burnt down in 1892. A new school was built in December 1892 at a cost of 300 pounds.[Hampden Street School] Whanganui, also spelled Wanganui, is an urban area and district on the west coast of the North Island of New Zealand. The spelling was changed to Whanganui in 2009. The area around the mouth of the Whanganui was a major site of pre-European Māori settlement. The first European traders arrived in 1831. A town, originally known as Petre was established at the river mouth in the early 1840s. The name was changed to Wanganui in 1854. The early years of the new town were problematic. Purchase of land from the local tribes had been haphazard and irregular, and as such many Māori were angered with the influx of Europeans onto land that they still claimed. It was not until the town had been established for eight years that agreements were finally reached between the colonials and local tribes, and some resentment continued. Wanganui grew rapidly after this time, with land being cleared for pasture. The town was linked by rail to both New Plymouth and Wellington by 1886. The name Whāngā nui means big bay or big harbour. Europeans called it Petre (pronounced Peter), after Lord Petre, an officer of the New Zealand Company, which established the first while settlement there.[Wikipedia] Queen's Park School was established in 1879, but closed & was demolished in 1977. All that remained was the Memorial Gates, built in 1926 in honour of past pupils who gave their lives in the First World War. The gates now form the entrance to the park and the local library, which occupies the site of the school.[Whanganui Library]
   
11 Maxwell Ave, Durie Hill
11 Maxwell Ave, Durie Hill
Image © Google Streetview
24 Calcutta Street, Khandalla
24 Calcutta Street, Khandalla
Image © Google Streetview
Dame Marie Clay
Dame Marie Clay
Image - Reading Recovery
    
Waikanae Presbyterian Church
Waikanae Presbyterian Church
Image ©  'TELPortfolio' [Flickr]
The Windward, 1930
The Winward, 1930
Image- Rob Irwin IV
Richard, Alan, Eve, John & Peter Wilton, 1962
Richard, Alan, Eve, John & Peter Wilton, 1962
Image- Rob Irwin IV
    
Waikanae Presbyterian Church was originally the Kelburn Presbyterian Church. The building was cut into segments and transorted to Waikanae.[Flickr]

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